Agronomist talks about rainfall

RAINLESS: Chickpeas may have been taken out of some cropping programs as the farmers wait for rain. Photo: FILE.

RAINLESS: Chickpeas may have been taken out of some cropping programs as the farmers wait for rain. Photo: FILE.

Winter sowing would usually be well under way in the Narromine region, but Mother Nature has different ideas this year as it is too dry for many farmers to put their crops in yet.

Farmers around the region are “dry-sowing” or have ceased sowing after a dry start in April, and are anxiously watching the forecast and rain fall predictions. 

Narromine Ag ‘n’ Vet Agronomist Michael Harris said the rainfall in April was minimal. 

“The rainfall in April was minimal and patchy for most of the district meaning the topsoil dried down significantly,” he said. 

“This created challenges around establishing crops. Those paddocks earmarked for canola that were too dry to sow, will now either be sown to a late season wheat or chickpeas if conditions allow.”

Mr Harris did say there was great rainfall in March and it is only the beginning of May so the season may kick start yet.

“We had excellent rainfall across the district in March, we saw the moisture profiles replenished after they were baked dry through a scorching January and February period,” he said.

“It’s only (early) May we could still have time for a good rainfall event to come through and really kick start our winter growing season.”