Dubbo's new Local Drug Action Teams to focus on prevention

Focus: Dr Erin Lalor, Alcohol and Drug Foundation CEO, has welcomed the Local Drug Action Teams to be based at Dubbo. Photo contributed.

Focus: Dr Erin Lalor, Alcohol and Drug Foundation CEO, has welcomed the Local Drug Action Teams to be based at Dubbo. Photo contributed.

More Local Drug Action Teams (LDATs) have been announced for the Parkes electorate, with funding set to roll out in Dubbo, Trangie, Warren, Cobar, Bourke and Wilcannia.

A new team based at Dubbo will will work to prevent harm from alcohol, ice and other drugs in Trangie.

An initial $10,000 received by each partnership will go to the next step of developing a community action plan.

The announcement of the four Local Drug Action Teams (LDAT) that will reach out to western NSW was made by the federal government and the Alcohol and Drug Foundation (ADF).

The LDAT Program supports organisations to build up partnerships in their neighbourhoods and use local knowledge to deliver evidence-informed alcohol and other drug harm prevention activities that are tailored to individual community needs, the ADF reports.

Dubbo Local Aboriginal Land Council Drug and Alcohol LDAT is a partnership between Dubbo Local Aboriginal Land Council, Mission Australia, Dubbo PCYC, Dubbo Aboriginal Community Working Party and Dubbo College South Campus.

It is based in Dubbo and is planning on delivering alcohol and other drug harm prevention activities in Dubbo and Geurie.

Royal Flying Doctor Service South Eastern Section has set up two LDATs to be based in Dubbo and deliver activities to Trangie and Warren.

Yaata Wiitya also comprises multiple partners and is set to focus on Wilcannia. 

The next step for the LDATs is to work together with the ADF to develop community action plans, which will confirm their evidence-based harm prevention activities, who they will reach and exactly where they will be delivered.

LDATs receive an initial $10,000 to develop the plans and can apply for further funding to deliver activities within the plan.

ADF chief executive officer Dr Erin Lalor said a high number of community partnerships had applied.

The announcement took the total number of LDATs to 244 nationally.

The demand showed “how determined” organisations were about building “healthier and more connected communities”, Dr Lalor said.

The CEO said tailored community led initiatives were vital in preventing and minimising harms.

“The LDAT program recognises that every community is unique and there’s no one-size fits all solution to addressing alcohol and other drug issues,” said Dr Lalor.

The program is part of the federal government’s investment of $298 million over four years under the National Ice Action Strategy.