Farmers2Founders participant Training Paddock looks to revolutionise employment

GOOD WORK: The 2019 harvest team at Strathmore Farm, Trangie NSW. Training Paddock founder Ashlea Miles said during busy periods, such as harvest, having a good handle on the skills of new employees was important.
GOOD WORK: The 2019 harvest team at Strathmore Farm, Trangie NSW. Training Paddock founder Ashlea Miles said during busy periods, such as harvest, having a good handle on the skills of new employees was important.

Founded by siblings Ashlea Miles, Jarryd Rae and Sophie Cook, Training Paddock aims to fundamentally change how employers interact with future and current employees, replacing the resume with a living platform, tracking their skills and abilities.

Ms Miles said the platform was designed to create accurate, transparent profiles of potential employees.

"Our platform will track workplace health and safety training, education and skill development in employees," she said.

"It allows employers and business owners to create not only very safe and specific training programs but also place those employees in the correct job to make sure they are highly productive and get home safely."

Training Paddock founder Ashlea Miles

Training Paddock founder Ashlea Miles

Ms Miles said the motivation for the platform was the families experiences on their own properties near Trangie and Coonamble NSW.

"We found over the course of running our farming businesses, as it grew and changed, trying to find the right work people was a challenge," she said.

"We hired people, but would tend to micromanage because we didn't fully understand their capabilities."

Ms Miles said when an employer wasn't confident of an employees skills they had to spend significant time monitoring and overseeing their employees.

"I think that not only proves challenging for time, it also devalues our employees," she said.

"To empower our employees they need to take responsibility and manage different situations."

Ms Miles said their own research showed their was a gap in the market for an employment platform.

"We feel that we fit the gap quite nicely because we place an emphasis on safety as well as well as placing an emphasis on informal skills and general education and training," she said.

"Being able to articulate that as an employee and engage in meaningful work is important and we feel that hasn't been met yet."

Ms Miles said her background as a teacher had shown her that there was a significant need for this platform across all sectors.

"We are very passionate about agriculture, however we feel that this need is across different industries as well," she said.

"I've seen young people come through the education system and lack the confidence or the ability to articulate what they can do.

"Some of them are very very talented and hard working and most people would be very lucky to have them in their businesses.

"It is only from a lack of transparency and communication that they are not able to present themselves as potential candidates for jobs."

Farmers2Founders

A current participant of the inaugural Farmers2Founders bootcamp, Ms Miles said the program aimed to develop entrepreneurship and technology capabilities amongst farmers.

Ms Miles said the three month program had a lot to offer farmers developing an agtech startup.

"When you are not familiar with technology development, when its not your first career, there are so many terms that you don't understand, so many different legals and people you need to talk to," she said.

"Farmers2Founders offer a really specific scaffold program, every business is different so they offer a tailored check the box plan.

"The very clear stepping stones created by the Farmers2Founders team help you progress in that three month period, it prevents you getting overwhelmed."

Ms Miles said so far she had found the bootcamp challenging, in a good way.

"You need to be resilient and dynamic, even though it was challenging all of the teams have been able to adapt, change and manage, the aim is to get the best out of us and I think that is what they are doing," she said.